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BLOG: 3 things enterprise IT can learn from the 2014 International CES

Frederic Paul | Jan. 14, 2014
Last week's giant Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas held some important lessons for enterprise technology

The International CES trade show that inundated Las Vegas and dominated tech headlines last week is no longer called the Consumer Electronics Show, but it's still all about consumer technology. That said, I found plenty of lessons for enterprise networking and technology professionals sprinkled among the more than 150,000 attendees, 3,000 exhibitors, and 2 million square feet of show floor.

Here are the three most important things that jumped out me over four days of blaring sound systems, sore feet, and shrimp cocktail:

Lesson Number 1: Size Matters.
The 2014 CES was all about really, really big screens. We're talking television sets the size of Jumbotrons and smartphones the size of tablets.

The giant TVs were all running at 4K or Ultra HD resolutions that demand huge amount of bandwidth but display stunning levels of detail, even when you get right up close to the screen. While they may not be an immediate hit with price-conscious consumers, you can be sure that they're raising the bar on what employees expect from the displays they use in the workplace. Even as workers increasingly rely on tablets and super-portable Ultrabooks with relatively small screens, when they sit down and plug in at the office, they're increasingly going to demand big-screen, high-resolution monitors on their desktops.

In the world of portable devices, it seems increasingly clear that small-screen smarpthones are going the way of flip phones. There were plenty of companies showing models with 6-inch screens, and no one was making fun of their comically large dimensions. Samsung even showed its Galaxy Note Pro — a tablet with a whoppping 12.2-inch, 4-megapixel display.

Lesson Number 2: Wearable computing will change everything.
Sure, the influx of wearable computing devices has so far been more hype than happening, more promise than performance. Most of the devices now on the market seem more proof of concept than polished product. And frankly, most of the new offerings I saw at the show didn't change that assessment. And yet, the sheer numbers of new devices — and the intense interest in the devices by the attendees — helped convince me that we're seeing the beginnings of a fundamental new category of products.

As that market matures and truly useful devices become available, they're going to change the way we relate to computing yet again, and enterprise IT will have to adjust. We've still got a little time... Google Glass isn't the answer, the Pebble and Samsung's Galaxy Gear smartwatch are too ugly to take seriously (even the new Pebble Steel), and Apple's Smartwatch is still only a rumor. But in the next year or two, wearable devices will be finding their way into enterprise networks just like smartphones did, and IT had better be ready.

 

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