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7 timeless lessons of programming 'graybeards'

Peter Wayner | March 10, 2015
Heed the wisdom of your programming elders, or suffer the consequences of fundamentally flawed code.

Speed matters to users

Long ago, I heard that IBM did a study on usability and found that people's minds will start to wander after 100 milliseconds. Is it true? I asked a search engine, but the Internet hung and I forgot to try again.

Anyone who ever used IBM's old green-screen apps hooked up to an IBM mainframe knows that IBM built its machines as if this 100-millisecond mind-wandering threshold was a fact hard-wired in our brains. They fretted over the I/O circuitry. When they sold the mainframes, they issued spec sheets that counted how many I/O channels were in the box, in the same way car manufacturers count cylinders in the engines. Sure, the machines crashed, exactly like modern ones, but when they ran smoothly, the data flew out of these channels directly to the users.

I have witnessed at least one programming whippersnapper defend a new AJAX-heavy project that was bogged down by too many JavaScript libraries and data flowing to the browser. It's not fair, they often retort, to compare their slow-as-sludge innovations with the old green-screen terminals that they have replaced. The rest of the company should stop complaining. After all, we have better graphics and more colors in our apps. It's true -- the cool, CSS-enabled everything looks great, but users hate it because it's slow.

The real Web is never as fast as the office network

Modern websites can be time pigs. It can often take several seconds for the megabytes of JavaScript libraries to arrive. Then the browser has to push these multilayered megabytes through a JIT compiler. If we could add up all of the time the world spends recompiling jQuery, it could be thousands or even millions of years.

This is an easy mistake for programmers who are in love with browser-based tools that employ AJAX everywhere. It all looks great in the demo at the office. After all, the server is usually on the desk back in the cubicle. Sometimes the "server" is running on localhost. Of course, the files arrive with the snap of a finger and everything looks great, even when the boss tests it from the corner office.

But the users on a DSL line or at the end of a cellular connection routed through an overloaded tower? They're still waiting for the libraries to arrive. When it doesn't arrive in a few milliseconds, they're off to some article on TMZ.

Algorithmic complexity matters

On one project, I ran into trouble with an issue exactly like Richard in "Silicon Valley" and I turned to someone below the drinking age who knew Greasemonkey backward and forward. He rewrote our code and sent it back. After reading through the changes, I realized he had made it look more elegant but the algorithmic complexity went from O(n) to O(n^2). He was sticking data in a list in order to match things. It looked pretty, but it would get very slow as n got large.

 

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