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Can cloud collaboration and data analytics cure cancer?

Rob Enderle | Aug. 24, 2015
After decades of research, the data needed to cure cancer exists, but, unfortunately, writes columnist Rob Enderle it’s not being shared or analyzed effectively. That may be changing thanks to Intel and Oregon Health and Science University.

Once that is done it is expected that the threat of cancer could be massively reduced to a point were only the treatment was a question, survival was a given.

Looking at data analytics differently

It stands to reason that this same approach could be used not only on other diseases (heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s are all on the list), but to other problems like global warming, defense, space travel, artificial intelligence, natural disaster forecasting and alerting, and the long-term survival and happiness of the human species. If we want to solve some of these huge problems we have to connect the information from a variety of companies, industries and even government institutions in a secure fashion so the total effort can be analyzed and progress optimized.

At the heart of this is a willingness to share data for the common good realizing that execution will still best define the most successful effort. We don’t typically like to share data at this scale but the influx of social media is making younger generations far more willing to share than the generations that are currently running companies, governments and industries.

Given that, the stage is set for firms to use an approach like this to redefine the world and address global problems far more effectively than we have in the past. And, of course, advance technically at a far faster pace through data collaboration.  

Time to put all that collected data to good use

We have been focusing too much on collecting data and too little on pooling our efforts and analyzing the result. Unfortunately, this increasingly means we, or someone else, has the data needed to solve our most critical problems but we just can’t analyze it to get the answer that, in some cases, could literally save our lives.

Programs like the Collaboration Cancer Cloud showcase how these huge problems could be solved, a part is technology, but another part is realizing that finding an answer is in many cases far more important than hoarding the data.

 

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