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Cisco backs OpenStack cloud platform

James Niccolai | Feb. 3, 2011
Cisco Systems has thrown its weight behind OpenStack, the open-source cloud infrastructure platform developed jointly by NASA and managed service provider Rackspace Hosting.

Canonical will distribute OpenStack with the next release of its Linux distribution, which should make it easier to set up an OpenStack environment. Canonical will also distribute Eucalyptus alongside it, Canonical Chairman Mark Shuttleworth said last month.

"We'll have both OpenStack and Eucalyptus-based cloud options in Ubuntu 11.04, due out in April, and we'll have to see how they shake out from a competitive perspective," he said in a video on Dell's Web site.

"The really important thing is that we're starting to get some sense of standardization at the infrastructure level of the cloud, and both Eucalyptus and OpenStack are going to be central to that process," Shuttleworth said.

Unlike Eucalyptus, OpenStack doesn't have built-in support for Amazon's APIs, but it says service providers can add them as "compatibility layers" if they want to. It says being "tied" to the AWS road map wouldn't be good for its users.

"Maybe Amazon is the default right now ... but no one but them controls their roadmap, and I think that's a very uncomfortable position for service providers and enterprises to be in in the long term," said Jim Curry, general manager for OpenStack at Rackspace.

The IPv6 support in Bexar was provided by Japan's NTT, another OpenStack member. The new release also adds support for eight international languages, Collier said.

The imaging service, called Glance, provides services for discovering, registering, and retrieving virtual machine images. And Bexar expands the storage object size from 5GB in Austin to unlimited size, according to Collier.

Work on the next release, code-named Cactus, is underway. One of the main goals is making it robust enough for large-scale deployments at telcos and service providers, and adding new tools for easier management, said Jesse Andrews, cofounder of Anso Labs, which works with NASA to run its own cloud environment.

 

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