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Cisco sees a data analytics fortune at the edge of the network

Stephen Lawson | Dec. 12, 2014
If you need to know when holiday shoppers are about to hit the checkout stands or when store shelves need to be stocked, Cisco Systems says a router can tell you.

If you need to know when holiday shoppers are about to hit the checkout stands or when store shelves need to be stocked, Cisco Systems says a router can tell you.

The company that commercialized routers 30 years ago is now using them to bring big-data analysis to the edges of networks, where some types of data may be priceless for a few seconds but not worth storing or sending to a cloud.

That's one piece of Cisco Connected Analytics for the Internet of Everything, a set of new and existing capabilities that the company is introducing as a portfolio on Thursday. CEO John Chambers and services chief Edzard Overbeek are set to do the unveiling at an event at Cisco headquarters, a measure of the importance Cisco places on its Internet of Everything (IoE) vision, which it pegs as a US$19 trillion economy-wide opportunity over the next 10 years. Analytics is a $7.3 trillion chunk of that, the company says.

Cisco wants to help enterprises and service providers bring together many types of data from different sources and glean insights to help them run things. The company already goes go customers to study their needs and craft a solution. Now some of the solutions it's put together many times will also be available as packages that don't require all the custom, on-site preparation. Initial packages include ones for network and video analytics.

The Internet of Things — Cisco includes related products and services and calls it IoE — may change the landscape of computing and networking by spreading both processes across more sites. In some cases this may be the only way to make IoT feasible, because sending data across networks costs time and money.

While core databases and applications still generate much of the big data in enterprises, another wave of bits is coming from the edges of networks. In some cases, to glean useful information from those data streams, enterprises will have to do it on the spot, Cisco says. That may be either because there's too much data to send over a wide-area network or because the round trip to the cloud takes too long.

"You actually improve your ability to make decisions quickly by doing the processing closer to where the data's created," said Mike Flannagan, vice president and general manager of Cisco's Data and Analytics Business Group. Cloud and enterprise data centers will still play roles in analytics, such as learning from data collected over time.

Other vendors, including Intel, also have their eyes on computing at the edge, where thousands of tiny computers could be sold in the next few years. Cisco calls the concept "fog computing" and launched a major effort in the area earlier this year.

 

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