Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Ericsson releases WebRTC browser and framework as open source

Mikael Ricknäs | Oct. 3, 2014
Ericsson is resurrecting its WebRTC-based browser, Bowser, to help spark the development of more websites and apps that embrace voice, video and messaging features.

"On mobile devices nobody cares about the browser. People care about apps," Brinkschulte said.

The jury is still out on whether WebRTC will be successful, whether in browsers or apps.

Standards were key to the success of text messaging, but in the last couple of years proprietary communications apps such as WhatsApp, Skype, Viber and Facebook Messenger have been the big hits. At the same time, standards-based technologies such as WebRTC and RCS (Rich Communications Services) have struggled to make a mark.

"Right now it seems like standards are becoming less and less important and proprietary solutions are gaining ground. The reason is that the user experience is typically better," Brinkschulte said.

Developers of proprietary apps can innovate much faster. When WhatsApp or Skype develop their apps they don't have to agree with competitors (who have their own interests to protect) on what audio or video codec to use.

"If you go proprietary, the world is your oyster. You can do whatever you want," Brinkschulte said.

But that doesn't mean he has given up on WebRTC. Because the technology only standardizes "the boring parts nobody cares about," the underlying specifications involved in transmitting data from sender to receiver, it still leaves room for developers to innovate, Brinkschulte said.

"That's why I think it can still succeed" Brinkschulte said.


Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.