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Full-duplex radio breakthrough can double Wi-Fi capacity

Tim Greene | Feb. 16, 2011
Stanford University researchers have found a way to double the capacity of wireless networks, while at the same time making them more reliable and efficient.

With full-duplex transmissions enabled, when an access point starts to receive from an end device, it can immediately send a message back saying it is busy so other end devices in the area know not to transmit, Levis says.

In cellular networks where carriers use repeaters to extend the range of base stations, this technology could be used to make transmitting boosted signals from cell phones to base stations and base stations to cell phones more efficient.

The researchers' design uses two transmitting antennas, one receiving antenna at each node. Both transmitting antennas send the same data, but the receiving antenna is placed so it receives signals from the transmitting antennas that are out of phase so they cancel out. The result is there is no signal - or at least a very reduced signal - for the receiving antenna to receive.

 

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