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Iron Mountain buys archiving vendor Mimosa

Chris Kanaracus | Feb. 22, 2010
Information management giant Iron Mountain said today it has acquired content archiving vendor Mimosa Systems for $112 million.

FRAMINGHAM 22 FEBRUARY 2010 - Information management giant Iron Mountain said today it has acquired content archiving vendor Mimosa Systems for $112 million.

Mimosa's on-premises NearPoint platform is known for its ability to archive Microsoft Exchange e-mail, SharePoint data and unstructured files. It will work alongside Iron Mountain's array of SaaS (software as a service) archiving offerings.

With Mimosa's technology, Iron Mountain can offer customers a hybrid archiving model that allows them to keep some data in-house, while offloading other information to the cloud.

Iron Mountain plans to retain Mimosa's employees. Its CEO, T.M. Ravi, will become chief marketing officer in Iron Mountain's digital division. Iron Mountain will also gain some 1,000 enterprise customers.

One analyst called the acquisition a "smart, aggressive move."

Mimosa is known for content archiving, but its platform can help with backup and recovery, Enterprise Strategy Group analyst Brian Babineau wrote in a blog post Monday. "As an example, NearPoint captures and tracks all events that occur within SharePoint, enabling item level recovery of SharePoint sites, lists, and list items."

The platform includes e-discovery capabilities as well.

Moving forward, Iron Mountain will need to rationalize its product portfolio, as it now has three e-mail archiving products, Babineau added.

As a startup, Mimosa focused on Microsoft technologies because of their large addressable market, but it is conceivable Iron Mountain will invest more money into NearPoint in order to support other applications, such as IBM's Lotus Notes, he wrote.

The Mimosa acquisition, which had been rumored for some weeks, followed Iron Mountain's 2007 purchase of e-discovery vendor Stratify for $158 million.

 

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