Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

The Public Cloud Arrives in 2013

Eric Ernest | Jan. 21, 2013
In corporate circles, inside the four-walls of IT, and at executive gatherings, tales of the affair between the public cloud and IT have fed uninterested CIOs with far-from-juicy gossip.

In corporate circles, inside the four-walls of IT, and at executive gatherings, tales of the affair between the public cloud and IT have fed uninterested CIOs with far-from-juicy gossip.

It was clearly a relationship--between IT and the public cloud--that was doomed from the start. A lack of trust, a world of insecurity, and a baggage of unresolved issues had crippled its foundation. A series of public cloud outages wasn't helping. And it seemed like IT would never be able to trust the cloud again.

Well for starters, there was a time when even the very concept of vanilla cloud computing took a considerable amount of time to build credibility. But with the passage of time, the cloud has only matured. From being a bottom-of-the-pyramid technology, cloud computing, in its many shapes and forms has grown to be a respectable and reliable technology for enterprises. This is evident from the fact that it features in the CIO priority list and is gradually making its presence felt in Indian organizations.

Consider this: According to the findings in the State of the CIO Survey, almost 80 percent of all respondents were at some stage of implementing or had already implemented a cloud solution. Also, 35 percent of all respondents thought that cloud computing will have the single most profound effect on the CIO's role in the near future.

When it comes to the type of cloud implementation CIOs plan to deploy, 48 percent said they opted for a private cloud, 38 percent chose hybrid cloud, and only 14 percent went for a public cloud. The public cloud might not be a favourite yet but the percentage of organizations implementing it has jumped by 9 percent--a significant improvement.

This makes the public cloud promising. Its gradual progress to the top is encouraging CIOs to spare a thought for the technology.

Going Public

Taking a leaf from their peers, some forward looking CIOs have already started looking up to the public cloud.

According to this edition of the State of the CIO Survey, a good majority--53 percent--of respondents see the main benefit of implementing a public cloud solution as that of increasing business agility. This was followed by other factors like reducing infrastructure costs and converting capex to opex, among other things. For Jagdish Belwal, CIO, Tata Motors, cost savings, scalability and process excellence are the benefits that he is expecting from his public cloud implementation. Belwal is planning to move his Web-based, external facing portals to IaaS platforms.

In addition, he also plans to explore moving non-production systems--such as development boxes--to an IaaS platform as they are prone to seasonality of usage and remain unused for long periods of time. On the other hand, he strongly feels that the cloud offers niche, expert process solutions. Tata Motors has decided to leverage this through a technology principle. "We will first look at the cloud to deliver any new business process requirement that comes our way. Our technology principle now is that whenever a new process enablement request comes in, we will first look at the cloud as an option, then we will look at packaged products. And then only we will turn to internal development" says Belwal.

 

1  2  3  Next Page 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.