Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

You can find out how your CPU compares to AMD's Ryzen for free

Gordon Mah Ung | Dec. 19, 2016
The test AMD used to show off Ryzen is open-source, so have at it.

The Ryzen hype train has left the station, and to build up its speed, AMD has actually released the source file it used to demonstrate just how fast its upcoming eight-core Summit Ridge CPU is.

This doesn’t usually happen, but because Blender is open-source and free, we now have a way for both haters and fans to test their own PC against the first Ryzen-based chip.

ryzen5
Blender is a popular and free renderer.

Step 1: Download and install Blender

First, download the appropriate version of Blender for your operating system from www.blender.org/download. This is a popular and free render that can produce some spectacular results, such as the open-source Tears of Steel movie. The version AMD used is the current 64-bit version of 2.78a for Windows 10. Blender updates can cause performance creep, so you should only use the same version for your testing.

A note for OS X and Linux fans: Blender has been and is OS-sensitive, which means it’s faster on some and slower on others. That’s fine though. If you to brag about how this OS is superior to that OS in a CPU render, you can do that.

But if you want to try to replicate AMD’s test on your hardware, you need to run it on Windows 10. And yes, I mean Windows 10, because Blender results under Windows 8 and Windows 7 won't match up.

Step 2: Download the source file from AMD

Once you have Blender downloaded and installed, you’ll need AMD’s source file which is available from http://download.amd.com/demo/RyzenGraphic_27.blend.

process idle
If you are really serious, you can run processidletasks, but most people don’t need to.

Optional Step: Prep your PC

If you just want a casual result you can skip the formal preparation of your PC. If you want a result that is possibly more repeatable, you should disconnect your machine from the network and reboot your machine.

You'd typically wait a few minutes for it to “settle down.” You can even invoke the “process idle tasks” command and then wait 15 or 20 minutes. ProcessIdleTasks basically tells Windows to perform its housecleaning tasks immediately, so they're less likely to happen during testing.

If you're going to be a stickler, you can also temporarily pause any anti-virus programs while running this program.

The vast majority of people reading this can just skip this step, but obviously don’t play a game or browse the Internet while the test is running. 

ryzen4
You should be ready to run the test AMD has run if your screen looks like this.

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.