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$160 dollar smartphone gives a glimpse of LTE's future

Mikael Ricknäs | March 28, 2014
The £99 (US$160) price for U.K. carrier EE's smartphone Kestrel without a contract gives a glimpse of a future with low-cost LTE devices, and is also an aggressive move by Qualcomm as competition in the chipset sector increases.

The £99 (US$160) price for U.K. carrier EE's smartphone Kestrel without a contract gives a glimpse of a future with low-cost LTE devices, and is also an aggressive move by Qualcomm as competition in the chipset sector increases.

Smartphones such as the Motorola Moto G and the Lumia 520 from Nokia lack LTE support, but a burgeoning chip war and the technology's growing popularity will help improve their successors. The introduction of Kestrel is an early sign of that development.

In addition to LTE with a theoretical download speed of 150Mbps (bits per second), it has a 4.5-inch screen with 960 x 540 pixel resolution. The phone is made by Huawei Technologies and has a quad-core Snapdragon 400 processor from Qualcomm. It uses Android 4.3 and will start shipping at the end of April.

That Kestrel was launched by a British operator isn't a coincidence, according to Ben Wood, director of research at CCS Insight.

"The U.K. is a hyper-competitive market and this is testament of Everything Everywhere's desire to really ensure it gets a massive lead in 4G subscriptions. ... I am not sure it's going to be the most appealing LTE phone on the planet, it's more about a statement of intent. But I am stunned by the price point," Wood said.

At the same time, it signals accelerating growth for LTE.

"Don't expect to see £99 LTE phones in every market. I think this is something specific for the U.K. market at this point. However, by the end of the year, absolutely, no question at all. This will set a benchmark that won't go unnoticed by other operators around the world," Wood said.

That Kestrel will be powered by a chipset from Qualcomm surprised Wood more than anything else.

"It shows that Qualcomm isn't afraid of a bit of competition and it is stepping up to make sure it remains the undisputed leader in LTE," he said.

The Snapdragon 400 processor that powers Kestrel was announced in June last year with the expressed purpose of bringing down the cost of LTE smartphones. Vendors like Broadcom, Intel, Marvell, MediaTek and Nvidia all see an opportunity to give Qualcomm a run for its money with their own LTE products.

"I can acknowledge there is a price war in terms of components and also supply chain that we can benefit from today and in the next quarters," said Eric Nicolas, head of own-branded devices at Orange, which owns half of EE and has its own LTE networks in countries such as France, Luxembourg, Poland, Spain and Slovakia.

Nicolas expects to see LTE smartphones that retail for €99 ($135) without a contract before the end of the year. Orange already has strong commitments to make that happen, he said.

 

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