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AMD's ARM chips not yet HSA compliant, but support is coming

Agam Shah | Feb. 14, 2014
Advanced Micro Devices' first ARM chips code-named Seattle will not initially be compliant with specifications from the HSA Foundation, which can boost overall system performance, but support will be added in future generations of the server chips.

But being HSA compliant has its benefits, as all the cores talk to each other and share memory. The HSA has a new uniform memory architecture called HUMA, which makes different memory types in a system accessible to all processors. As a result, developers have access to a larger shared memory pool for code execution.

"It would share cache between cores, and that would be a benefit," McGregor said.

HSA also helps reduce memory transfers, which improves system performance while saving power. HSA tools also ease programming as coders don't have to keep track of what's in each memory pool.

HSA Foundation has set an ambitious goal on hardware and software tools, but it's going to be a while until programmers and system makers can take full advantage of it, McGregor said.

"They're still in the process of developing of the tools" and libraries, McGregor said.



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