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Computer geeks as loners? Data says otherwise

Sharon Machlis and Patrick Thibodeau | Feb. 17, 2014
U.S. Census data shows tech worker marriage rates are well over the national average; more unmarried IT workers than the average, too

If your job is less social, you are less likely to meet that someone special, said Orbuch. Tech jobs, she said, are less social.

For this data analysis IT job categories were: IT managers, computer scientists, a broad range of IT analysts, as well as programmers, developers, support specialists, network and database administrators.

Michael Aamodt, an industrial organizational psychologist at DCI Consulting, who has looked at occupational behavior, said the problem with raw data is you are trying to [determine whether the outcome] is a function of the job itself or the people who go into the job.

Percent IT professionals who are married, by state

State

Percent Married

Arizona

55.0%

California

61.0%

Colorado

62.9%

Connecticut

61.9%

Florida

57.7%

Georgia

63.8%

Illinois

65.2%

Maryland

62.9%

Massachusetts

62.3%

Michigan

63.5%

Minnesota

66.1%

Missouri

61.9%

New Jersey

70.7%

New York

52.5%

North Carolina

66.4%

Ohio

64.4%

Pennsylvania

61.1%

Texas

63.5%

Virginia

65.0%

Washington

59.7%

Wisconsin

61.1%

   

Includes states with a sample size of 600 or larger. Source: Computerworld analysis of 2012 American Community Survey data, U.S. Census Bureau

Aamodt noted that the data doesn't control for gender, race, age or income. For instance, a higher percentage of females will get married earlier, which generates some differences in the never married category, said Aamodt.

Tina B. Tessina, a psychotherapist and author of Money, Sex and Kids: Stop Fighting about the Three Things That Can Ruin Your Marriage, drew on her patients' experiences to determine whether it's the people or the job that influences outcomes.

For instance, Tessina sees people in technical and scientifically focused jobs who have trouble making emotional connections and contact. For those in more social fields, such as health care, the issues may be less about emotional connections than in dealing with financial issues or spending too much time at work, she said.

 

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