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Cyber crime: dissolving legal and technical barriers

AvantiKumar | June 14, 2011
CyberSecurity Malaysia and Attorney General's Chambers legal and technical professionals in Malaysia seek to dissolve barriers in the war against cyber crime.

CyberSecurity Malaysia CEO -  Lt. Col. Husin Haji Jazri (Retired)


PHOTO - CyberSecurity Malaysia CEO -  Lt. Col. Husin Haji Jazri (Retired).

KUALA LUMPUR, 14 JUNE 2011 - Malaysian government agency CyberSecurity Malaysia and the country's Attorney General's Chambers is to hold an inaugural seminar to help dissolve barriers between legal and IT technical professionals in the fight against cyber crime, said the agencies.

The AGCSM [Attorney General's Chambers] 2011 Seminar, called 'Bridging Barriers: Legal and Technical of Cyber Crime Case', is the first of its kind in Malaysia, which  combines legal and technical aspects pertaining to cyber crime cases, according to CyberSecurity Malaysia chief executive officer, Lt. Col. Dato' Husin Jazri (Retired). "The Seminar will be held on 5 - 7 July 2011 at the Dewan Sri Endon, Puspanitari, Putrajaya, Malaysia. It will be officiated by YAB Dato' Seri Mohd Najib bin Tun Hj Abdul Razak, the Prime Minister of Malaysia and will be graced by YB Datuk Seri Dr. Maximus Johnity Ongkili, Minister of Science, Technology and Innovation (MOSTI) as well as YB Tan Sri Abdul Gani Patail, the Attorney General of Malaysia, which is under the PM's Department."

Husin said the objectives of the seminar included the raising of awareness of the legal issues connected to the investigation and prosecution of cyber crime cases. "In addition, the discussion will include the technical aspects such as real-time evidence gathering and computer forensics because cyber-related legal issues are tied up closely with the technical issues and finally to discuss the possibilities in bridging the gap between legal and technical aspects in cyber crime cases."

"Cyber security is a very important component of today's national security, public safety and privacy,"  he said. "With the advancement of technology, Internet usage in the country has increased tremendously and at the same time, we are all exposed to threats in the cyberworld. This Seminar will certainly be an excellent platform for all parties concerned to address and explore possibilities of bridging the gaps between the legal and technical aspects of cyber crime cases in order to improve and strengthen security capabilities and capacities in both legal and technical."

"Prosecutors today need to be familiar not just with the laws of evidence and procedure," said the Attorney General of Malaysia, YB Tan Sri Abdul Gani Patail, during a recent regional conference. "If they are to successfully prosecute a cyber crime, they also need to be 'IT-savvy'. In this regard, all States need to train specialist cyber crime investigators, prosecutors and judges on the use of the available legislative framework and in particular on the technical elements involve in prosecuting cyber crime cases. This is undoubtedly a resource - a heavy endeavour and a big financial investment for any law enforcement agency."

Registration (www.agcsm,my) is open to law enforcers, regulators, prosecutors, policy makers, IT officers, industrial analysts, lecturers, researchers and academicians.

 

 

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