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Full text of President Obama's intelligence directive

Michael Cooney | Jan. 20, 2014
President Barack Obama today issued new directions for the government's intelligence to follow. Among the items released today were an official Presidential Directive and a Fact Sheet on the details of the new policy.

Consumer Privacy Codes of Conduct
Two years ago, the President released a Blueprint for Consumer Privacy in the Digital Age as a "dynamic model of how to offer strong privacy protection and enable ongoing innovation in new information technologies."  Following the release of the Blueprint, the Administration has convened the private sector, privacy experts, and consumer advocates to develop voluntary codes of conduct to safeguard sensitive consumer data.  Last summer a multi-stakeholder group completed the first such code on how mobile apps should access private information.  The Department of Commerce is continuing this multi-stakeholder process, aiming to launch the development of new codes of conduct in 2014.

Commitment to an Open Internet
Maintaining an open, accessible Internet, including the ability to transmit data across borders freely is essential for global growth and development.  We will redouble our commitment to promote the free-flow of information around the world through an inclusive approach to Internet governance and policymaking.  Individuals in the 21st century depend on free and unfettered access to data flows without arbitrary government regulation.  Businesses depend increasingly on agreed data-sharing regimes that allow information to move seamlessly across borders in support of global business operations.  Developing countries and small businesses around the world in particular have a lot at stake, and much to lose from limitations restricting the Internet as an engine of prosperity and expression.  Requirements to store data or locate hardware in a given location hurt competition, stifle innovation, and diminish economic growth.  And they undermine the DNA of the Internet, which by design is a globally-distributed network of networks.   We will continue to support the multi-stakeholder, inclusive approach to the Internet and work to strengthen and make more inclusive its policy-making, standards-setting, and governance organizations.

Presidential Policy Directive — Signals Intelligence Activities

The United States, like other nations, has gathered intelligence throughout its history to ensure that national security and foreign policy decisionmakers have access to timely, accurate, and insightful information.

The collection of signals intelligence is necessary for the United States to advance its national security and foreign policy interests and to protect its citizens and the citizens of its allies and partners from harm. At the same time, signals intelligence activities and the possibility that such activities may be improperly disclosed to the public pose multiple risks. These include risks to: our relationships with other nations, including the cooperation we receive from other nations on law enforcement, counterterrorism, and other issues; our commercial, economic, and financial interests, including a potential loss of international trust in U.S. firms and the decreased willingness of other nations to participate in international data sharing, privacy, and regulatory regimes; the credibility of our commitment to an open, interoperable, and secure global Internet; and the protection of intelligence sources and methods.

 

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