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Gartner: Android and Apple win big globally in Q1

Mikael Ricknäs, IDG News Service | May 19, 2011
Android became the most popular smartphone operating system worldwide in the first quarter of 2011, while Apple saw its share of the market grow, according to a report Gartner issued Thursday on sales of mobile phones to end users.

Android became the most popular smartphone operating system worldwide in the first quarter of 2011, while Apple saw its share of the market grow, according to a report Gartner issued Thursday on sales of mobile phones to end users.

Overall mobile phone sales totaled 427.8 million units in the first quarter of 2011, an increase of 19% from the same period in 2010. Smartphone sales added up to 100.8 million, compared to 54.5 million in Q1 last year. They now account for 23.6% of mobile phone sales, an increase of 85% since the first quarter of 2010, according to Gartner.

Android is leaving other operating systems in the dust, growing its market share in one year from 9.6% to 36%, Gartner reported. Its lead over Symbian is now almost 10 million as it ran on 36.3 million smartphones sold versus Symbian's 27.6 million. Symbian's market share, on the other hand, has dropped from 44.2% to 27.4%. Sales of smartphones based on the operating system increased, but couldn't keep up with Android's phenomenal growth.

While Apple was the fourth-place finisher in the quarter's smartphone rankings, it sold 16.9 million units to end users worldwide, more than doubling sales of its iPhones year-on-year, helping the company's market share grow from 2.3% to 3.9%.

Apple's lead over Research In Motion, which is in fifth place, is now almost 4 million phones. A year ago, RIM was up by 2.4 million units. Still RIM's sales grew from 10.8 million to 13 million, and its market share remained at 3%.

Newly joined partners Nokia and Microsoft are both struggling. Nokia is still the largest phone manufacturer. The company sold 107.6 million phones, but its market share dropped from 30.6% to 25.1%, which is its lowest point since 1997.

Windows Phone had only modest sales that reached 1.6 million units in the first quarter of 2011, as devices launched at the end of last year failed to catch much consumer interest and operators continued to focus on Android, according to Gartner.

Nokia hasn't yet said when its Windows smartphone will arrive. The company won't divulge ship dates until closer to when the first models arrive, but the pressure is on to deliver the devices this year, Nokia CEO Stephen Elop said when the company announced its first quarter results.

In the long term, Nokia's backing will accelerate Windows Phone's momentum, Gartner wrote. Nokia needs to make consumers forget that they are buying a Windows phone, because the current perception is that Microsoft is something dad uses at work, according to Carolina Milanesi, research vice president at Gartner.

 

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