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Hands-on with Mail 9 in El Capitan: Improved full-screen support, swipe gestures, and more

Peter Cohen | Aug. 3, 2015
Mail is one of those apps most of us take for granted. It's one of the first apps we configure when setting up a Mac. In El Capitan, that foundational app experience is the same--what's more, Apple has introduced big improvements to Mail 9 that make it easier to work on and do more with your messages.

apple mail 9 mac icon

Mail is one of those apps most of us take for granted. It's one of the first apps we configure when setting up a Mac. In El Capitan, that foundational app experience is the same--what's more, Apple has introduced big improvements to Mail 9 that make it easier to work on and do more with your messages.

Much more robust full-screen support and swipe gestures are two of Mail 9's most noticeable visual changes. That's not all: Improved data detectors make it easier to add events to your calendar and contacts to your contact database. There are other under the hood improvements to make it easier to find what you need and act on it.

Full-screen support and gestures

Full-screen support in Mail 9 makes it easier to juggle multiple email messages. Let's say you're composing an email and you want to check another message or copy something from it. The email message you're composing now moves to the bottom of the screen, so you can access your email inbox, copy text or attachments from other messages, and more.

It's also easier to manage more than one email conversation at the same time. You can switch between active email threads using tabs, just like in Safari. And those tabs slide to the bottom of the full-screen Mail window, just like a single message. It's less clutter to deal with while you look for other important messages, copy content from them, find relevant attachments and more.

Mail 9's improved gesture support will be comfortable to anyone who also uses an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. On a Mac equipped with a Magic Mouse or a trackpad (either a built-in one on a Mac laptop or a Magic Trackpad), you can use the same gestures you're accustomed to on iOS: Swipe left to delete a message, swipe right to mark it as read.

You're probably already familiar with data detectors: if you move your mouse over a date and time, for example, you may see a popup appear to add that as a calendar item. You can add contacts the same way. Data detectors get a little more front and center with Mail 9: Mail adds banners in between the address field and the body of the message with data it's detected and possible actions to take.

For example, if Mail 9 recognizes that someone's asking to get together, it'll list the event as an option you can add to your calendar. And if the message is from someone who's not already in your address book, you can easily add them to your contacts database the same way.

 

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