Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

HP honcho Bradley: Post-PC world claim "just wrong"

Tom Spring | Sept. 20, 2012
Bradley, executive vice president of HP's printing and personal systems group, clearly lives and breathes his company's products, and it shows in his answers to my questions during a recent phone and email Q&A.

Bradley: I don't think those reports are entirely accurate. Our first Windows 8 tablets are going to be on the x86 platform. We are going with Intel and AMD architecture after getting a lot of input from our customers. Our focus is going into the enterprise and creating phenomenal products. That has an enormous amount to do with our decision.

We know and understand the robust and very established ecosystem that x86 applications provides. We see x86 chips delivering one of the best experiences in the short term and near future. We will continue to develop with our partners in the ARM ecosystem. We think that work is very important. But our first tablets will be based on the x86 architecture.

PCW: Can you describe how the consumer PC desktop and laptop market has changed just in the past five years and how hard it is to stay on top?

Bradley: Some great changes have emerged over recent years. Thin and light notebooks, like Ultrabooks, and beautiful designs that combine form and function come immediately to mind. We have shown how something you can't do without also can be a style statement.

Audio is an important area for change, too, because today a PC is a vehicle for music, YouTube videos, downloaded media, video chats, online trainings, a whole range of things. Differentiated technology like Beats Audio from HP really helps us give our customers an outstanding experience.

We are very happy with our portfolio and it only gets better with our Windows 8 products. Advances in touch capabilities and what that means for hybrid and tablet designs and features like "instant on" and "always connected" are really meaningful. We need to earn our customers' loyalty every day.  And we, along with our channel partners, are committed to it.

PCW: What are consumers' computing needs going to be towards the end of the decade?

Bradley: I think there are two really big trends that are going to dominate the market later this decade. First is because of the explosion of new device types--tablets, phones, etc.--that are just in the beginning stages. People will really want to manage their personal collection of devices and clouds. We feel really good about our potential to lead this trend.

The second big area will be security. We build very secure devices for commercial customers today, but they take an IT department to manage to the fullest extent. Making security robust and easy for the consumer will be key in the coming years.

Of course, the trend toward thin, light and beautiful plus supercharged connectivity will continue.  NFC is promising, and we're adding it to some PCs in our portfolio. More web-connected devices, like some of our printers today. Great screens using IPS technology, meaning your content is viewable at any angle. Customizable tablets so enterprise verticals can really get exactly what they need.

 

Previous Page  1  2  3  4  Next Page 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.