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“If a business is not digital, it’s dying”: BMC’s APAC president

Zafirah Salim | Dec. 15, 2014
In this interview, Gavin Selkirk, Regional President, Asia Pacific of BMC Software, explains the rationale behind its new "Living IT" initiative and shares insights on the company's standing on digital transformation, including BMC's future plans, following the company's recent privatisation.


Gavin Selkirk, Regional President, Asia Pacific at BMC Software

As businesses across every industry focus on reinventing themselves to take advantage of today's fast-paced digital economy, BMC Software has recently unveiled a new strategic initiative called "Living IT" in early October.

According to the IT management software company, this new initiative seeks to create an entirely new technology experience for employees and IT managers through smart, next-generation social and collaboration tools that enhance productivity, simplify administrative tasks and enable digital services that directly engage customers, partners and stakeholders. By matching technology to human behaviour in this way, BMC helps organisations bring IT to life by enhancing their existing systems, driving agility and speed, and creating greater customer value.

In this interview, Gavin Selkirk, Regional President, Asia Pacific of BMC Software, explains the rationale behind this new initiative and shares insights on the company's standing on digital transformation, including BMC's future plans, following the company's recent privatisation.

What is the idea behind this "Living IT" initiative, and can you provide some examples as to how this will benefit companies?

We are living in a world where cloud, social and mobile have transformed the way we live and run our businesses. Companies that deliver services through mobile apps often do so using complex applications and infrastructure that are not made for a cloud, social and mobile world. A typical example is an Internet banking app - it is served over the cloud, but the data and processes might reside in a mainframe. We need to be able to help companies master the infrastructure to deliver those services.

With the advent of the CMO (chief marketing officer) and the bifurcation of the IT budget, innovation is happening in isolation in many organisations. We've seen examples of companies that have exposed themselves to compliance risks and data breaches. There's a bank we know of that developed a compelling mobile app, but ended up blowing up their mainframe. We believe there's a need to industrialise the legacy infrastructure and unlock high speed innovation in a trusted manner.

That's what Living IT is all about. We believe that BMC is uniquely placed because of its history of understanding the journey that companies have been on. We understand how to optimise the backend and unlock innovation at the front end.

One way we did that is by developing a product called MyIT. The whole concept was to take a mobile-first and social approach where you subscribe to IT services that matter to you, like locating the nearest printer, through a mobile device.

Vodafone, for example, has deployed MyIT to 150,000 employees. They have reduced calls to the service desk by 90 percent and employees are using it to book services such as facilities or technology support. They are taking a genius bar approach, where employees with context- and location-aware apps can book an appointment with an IT professional at their location. This has led to huge cost savings with fewer calls to the service desk, as well as improvements in employee satisfaction, which is way off the charts. It's an example of how the power of cloud, mobile and social has transformed the engagement between business and IT.

 

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