Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Intel invokes Apple's Knowledge Navigator to envision future smartphones

Agam Shah | April 18, 2013
More than 25 years after Apple introduced "Knowledge Navigator" as a concept that envisioned the future of computers, Intel has reintroduced the concept as the future of smartphones.

With the PC market slumping, Intel is focusing more of its chip activity on mobile devices. The company has a small presence in the smartphone and tablet market, which is dominated by ARM.

Intel hopes to use its manufacturing advantage -- which is considered the most advanced in the industry -- to build smaller and faster chips. The company is releasing Atom chips for tablets and smartphones using the 22-nanometer process in the next 12 months, and hopes for a quick transition to the more advanced 14-nm process.

The company will start making chips for PCs using the 14-nm process late this year. The nanometer process refers to the underlying physics used in factories to create substrates on which chip features are etched.

"You'll see over the course of the next 12 months as we roll out more of our own chips and technologies and then more customers building things based on those. We want to get our technology as far and wide as we can," Bell said.

The "myth" that ARM is better than Intel on power efficiency has been "busted," Bell said. Intel officials have used as a reference point the Motorola Razr I smartphone with an Atom chip, which the company insists has equal-to-better battery life than a Motorola Razr M, a similar phone based on Qualcomm's Snapdragon S4 dual-core processor.

"We have as good a performance as anyone else, and it's not necessarily the exact best battery life, but we're near the top of the pack," Bell said.

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.