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It looks like curtains for Windows RT with end of Lumia 2520 production

Chris Martin | Feb. 5, 2015
Has Microsoft finally given up on ARM-based Windows RT? It certainly looks like it with no more Surface 2 or Lumia 2520 production.

It looks like the inevitable end of Windows RT as Microsoft ends production of devices including the Lumia 2520.

It was only last week that Microsoft confirmed it would no longer manufacture any more Surface 2 tablets. Now it has done the same with the Nokia Lumia 2520, another Windows RT tablet.

"We are no longer manufacturing Nokia Lumia 2520; however, those still eager to buy Nokia Lumia 2520 should visit Microsoft Retail Stores, MicrosoftStore.com, third-party retailers and resellers for the latest availability," said Microsoft to The Verge.

Microsoft was the last remaining manufacturer of Windows RT devices so this signals the end of the ARM-based half of Windows which we all knew would come eventually. Partners such as Acer, Asus, Dell, Samsung and Lenovo all backed Windows RT to start with but quickly pulled out.

In 2013 Toshiba commented on the RT saying: "For the time being, Toshiba will focus on bringing Windows 8 products to market. We will continue to look into the possibility of Windows RT products in the future while monitoring market conditions."

Of course, the software giant hasn't said outright it won't make any more in the future but it seems highly unlikely with the focus now firmly on Windows 10 which will run across all devices including small tablets and phones.

Back in November of 2013, Julie Larson-Green, EVP of Devices for Microsoft admitted the firm had too many operating systems and wouldn't have three going forward (Windows, Windows RT and Windows Phone).

Commenting on the difference between full Windows and Windows RT, she said: "I think we didn't explain that super-well. I think we didn't differentiate the devices well enough. They looked similar. Using them is similar. It just didn't do everything that you expected Windows to do."

 

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