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KPMG funds big data education project for 100 PhD students in Europe

Matthew Finnegan | Feb. 18, 2014
KPMG is funding an education project to teach data science skills to European PhD students, as it continues to invest in big data.

KPMG is funding an education project to teach data science skills to European PhD students, as it continues to invest in big data.

The accountancy and consulting firm is sponsoring a five-week programme along with organisers Pivigo Academy, aimed at turning 100 science PhD students into data scientists.

The main focus of the programme will be to provide knowledge of a particular big data topic, with participants completing a piece of coursework tackling a real life big data problem. This will involve teaching the "commercial tools and techniques needed to be hired into data science roles", KPMG said.

Alwin Magimay, head of data and analytics at KPMG commented that the programme will help "create a much needed data and analytics pool in the UK".

"Data science will change the way we live, work and interact with others. It presents a real opportunity for business to drive insight and value from the abundance of data being created in the digital world," said Magimay. "We are only at the very beginning of this revolution and KPMG wants to be at the forefront of it."

The Science to Data Science summer school will be held at the University of Westminster in Harrow, London, and will run from 4 August to 5 September 2014. Applicants are required to a PhD in analytical science and have experience in at least one programming language including, Python, C/C++, R, IDL and Java. The deadline for application is 31 March.

KPMG announced a $100 million (£66m) big data investment fund last November with the launch of KPMG Capital in London. The fund aims to "identify, innovate and accelerate the rapid delivery of data and analytics offerings to clients" in areas such as risk management and cost optimisation, as well as enabling them to tap into new revenue streams.

 

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