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Lack of problem sharing leads to further security issues: IBM

Patrick Budmar | June 25, 2013
Technology vendor finds security teams are insular and do not talk about issues.

Security teams of organisations tends to be a bit introspective and insular, making it a challenge to get them to speak about the problems they face within their business.

IBM A/NZ security expert, Scott Ainslie, bases his observation on the research found in the Truth behind the Trends whitepaper, which uncovered that security teams do not share information relating to problem they encounter and prefer to keep it to themselves.

Ainslie said this approach creates problems, as the security team essentially tackles problems independent of external advice.

"From our experience, getting external advice and seeking collaboration with similar or likeminded people in the industry, is very helpful," he said.

"More often than not, the problems we feel we are facing uniquely are not as such."

Ainslie adds that problems between divisions and team tend to share common threads, and if they work collaboratively the chances of resolving the problem or coming to a common solution is much easier.

"If you tackle a problem on your own, it becomes a problem of your own making," he said.

Bigger is better
While a lot of organisations are quite different in the way they define their architecture, infrastructure and operations, Ainslie said that the problem is often the same and there are a number of factors that can be tackled collaboratively.

"It's really good to work with a global organisation, because you'll see something coming before it gets to you," he said.

For that reason, Ainslie said that from a client's perspective, IBM's global position in the IT environment translates in a benefit when it comes to security.

"If something is occurring somewhere in the world, we will see it first," he said.

"Therefore, we will have some knowledge about it and share with our clients before they encounter the problem."

 

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