Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Microsoft alum: Windows 8 "a much deadlier assault weapon" than Windows 7

Tim Greene | Jan. 24, 2013
Former Microsoft senior VP says Windows 8 on ARM tablets is a "scale 9 earthquake";

He admires the strategy of porting Office applications to Windows 8 tablets based on ARM, known as Windows RT. Other tablets can support Office but only via remote services, not locally. "Less need for constant connectivity for 8-powered tablets when running MS-Office applications means a further leg up over Google's solution," he writes.

Apparently the book was written before Microsoft's Windows 8 leader Steven Sinofsky quit the company just after Windows 8 launched Oct. 26. Kempin says the company should tap Sinofsky to champion Surface as a product fanatic as focused as Steve Jobs was at Apple.

"Like others I always wait for a service pack to be released before trusting a new OS version," Kempin says. "[Sinofsky] will need to correct this notion with product excellence right out of the chute to gain vital momentum. This is in particular important for changing MS's fortune in the media tablet market where Apple, Google and Amazon are seen as leaders.

Blindly mimicking Apple in order to take sales from it is a mistake, and that means getting rid of its new brick and mortar Windows Stores. "The company needs to get rid of all distractions like her doomed retail stores," he writes.

He says Microsoft's investment in Barnes & Noble and its Nook e-reader represent an assault on Amazon and its Kindle tablets and e-readers. He says Microsoft miscalculated the market for them when it devoted research into the devices in 1998. "But the developers involved in this effort were told to shut down because their solution was not Windows centric enough," he says.

That was the wrong way to look at it, though. "You do not need Windows to read a book - MS-DOS would have sufficed and could have easily been replaced with more advanced technology later," he says.

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.