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Mobility will continue to force Australian retailers to evolve: Salmat

Patrick Budmar | Jan. 21, 2014
Communications and marketing company finds that a growing number of consumers are using the smartphones while shopping.

The rapid take up of new technologies by Australians is an encouraging trend, according to Salmat Digital.

Executive general manager of the communications and marketing company, David Blakers, has been impressed with how local consumers have influenced retailers to change their customer shopper experiences, essentially "forcing" them to be more competitive and offer more choice.

"As an example, eConsultancy research has shown that 70 per cent of mobile-assisted shoppers are viewing products in-store but purchasing then from online retailers," he said.

Blakers also supports this claim with research by Walmart.com, which found 12 per cent of its online sales are attributed to consumers store using a customised version of its mobile site in one of its brick and mortar stores.

"Because of this, our clients have had to try to respond quickly to keep up with their customer demands," he said.

By this he means they had to look into multi channel experiences, pop up stores, improved customer service, shop anywhere, shop anytime and fast delivery, all of which are becoming an "expected retailer experience."

Another trend Blakers has seen over the last few months is an increase in retailers, as well as businesses, carrying out insourcing, where they heavily invest in growing their marketing, data, and digital teams.

Convenience led technology
If Blakers were to summarise his key prediction for 2014, it would come down to "more change."

For one, Blakers expects Australians' appetite for technology-led convenience will continue grow.

"Consumers will increasingly dictate when they will shop, where they will shop and how much they will pay," he said.

In instances where it has not already happened, mobile device use will become the norm when it comes to retailing.

"Further integration into our lives, homes, cars and offices will accelerate the range of marketing activities in mobile communications," Blakers said.

 

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