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SSDs requiring data recovery on the rise: Kroll Ontrack

Patrick Budmar | Jan. 15, 2014
IT consultancy finds also finds that not enough people are not using the Cloud to back-up data.

The IT industry is all about solid-state drives (SSD) at the moment, but Kroll Ontrack warns that this approach comes with a drawback.

APAC general manager of the IT consultancy, Adrian Briscoe, has seen this growing interesting in the flash based storage leading to a "real explosion" in SSDs needing recovery.

"Our clean room is seeing a large increase in service requests for data recovery for flash and solid state media from a variety of mobile devices," he said.

What Briscoe finds to be particularly remarkable is the amount of devices that are never backed up or synchronised with Cloud storage, a step that would help overcome some of the headaches connected to data loss.

While the reliability of the storage technology is constantly being improved, Briscoe foresees that data loss incidents attributed to SDD will only escalate this year, mostly due to BYOD roll outs and further differentiation in mobile devices.

Nothing is safe
Despite data loss and recovery is nothing new in the IT industry, Briscoe said some things never change when it comes to prevent and dealing with such incidents.

According to Briscoe, 66 per cent of Kroll Ontrack's customers typically had a backup solution in place at the time of a data loss incident, yet somehow the solution failed.

"In a time of advanced and easy to use back-up and disaster recovery solutions, we still see many companies that desperate after a major data disaster," he said.

Cloud storage providers have touted back-up and disaster recovery as benefits, but Briscoe warns that they are "not as bullet proof" as many in the industry may assume.

"No matter how advanced your back up and disaster recovery, last resort data recovery should always be part of disaster recovery plans and manuals," he said.

 

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