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Supernova hands-on: A MOBA you make your own

Hayden Dingman | Feb. 27, 2015
It's official: There's another MOBA coming to market. This past week I got the chance to go hands-on with Supernova, a new sci-fi themed MOBA from Bandai Namco. I learned three things: 1) I'm not very good at MOBAs. 2) Supernova seems like a fine MOBA. 3) I'm starting to find it difficult to tell one MOBA from another.

It's official: There's another MOBA coming to market. This past week I got the chance to go hands-on with Supernova, a new sci-fi themed MOBA from Bandai Namco. I learned three things: 1) I'm not very good at MOBAs. 2) Supernova seems like a fine MOBA. 3) I'm starting to find it difficult to tell one MOBA from another.

There seem to be two primary gimmicks that set Supernova apart, and they both stem from the same idea: Progression. In Supernova you directly manage upgrading your character's stats throughout the course of the match and the makeup of your creep army.

Now in layman's terms: Each time your character levels up, you need to pop open a menu and decide which stats to improve. Like an RPG. Or you can just do like me, decide you know absolutely nothing about what's going on with your character, and set it to "auto."

Obviously MOBAs are also known for creeps — AI-controlled fodder enemies that mostly serve to provide experience to opponents but in large numbers can do some real damage. In your standard MOBA creeps are entirely automated though. They spawn at set intervals, each team has the same make-up, and they just meet in the middle and fight.

Supernova allows you to customize your army over the course of the match (or automate it if you don't feel like micromanaging). Each fodder enemy or player you kill nets you gold you use to upgrade the composition of your army for next time, either by adding more low-power minions or unlocking tiers of progressively more expensive, stronger units.

Our first match, for instance, I maxed out with fifteen of the lowest-cost units, which meant every time my creeps spawned there was a massive wave of utterly useless garbage marching across the screen to get slaughtered. The second match I focused on tiering up early, which gave me powerful units — but only four or five, so no match for a decent team.

Therein lies the biggest problem — at no point did I feel threatened by these mobs, which means they're still just kind of useless set dressing for the player-versus-player combat. They're still, as far as I can tell, a means for leveling up and not a legitimate threat that players need to pay attention to.

And as if there wasn't enough to pay attention to, there's a Research system layered over the top. Research draws from the same pool of resources as your army composition but provides buffs instead of physical units. If that sounds vague, it's because I didn't even realize this system existed until halfway through our second game.

 

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