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How to Put Your Company on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter

David Daw | Oct. 18, 2011
It’s telling that when the Google+ social network launched in June, businesses clamored to get on the service as quickly as possible. For most businesses, being active on social media is now a requirement. Although Google+ is still dragging its feet on creating pages for businesses, getting your company page started on Facebook, Linked In, and Twitter takes just minutes.

It’s telling that when the Google+ social network launched in June, businesses clamored to get on the service as quickly as possible. For most businesses, being active on social media is now a requirement. Although Google+ is still dragging its feet on creating pages for businesses, getting your company page started on Facebook, Linked In, and Twitter takes just minutes.

Choose a Name

When you try to register your business's name on a social network, you may find that it's already taken. Both Facebook and Twitter have an appeals process to which you can turn if your business name has been claimed, but they offer no guarantees. Businesses that have been through the appeals process say that Twitter tends to be a bit more generous than Facebook, which usually requires a trademark and a decent amount of poking and prodding before it allows you to have your name.

You can always ask the current owner to hand over the Facebook or Twitter page, but be prepared: The other party may want a payout in exchange for giving up the name. If all else fails you can register a slight variation on your business's name, but make sure to remain consistent. Appearing under one company name on Facebook and another name on Twitter makes it hard for customers to find you.

In addition, prepare a company tagline for Facebook’s About section, LinkedIn’s company description, and Twitter’s bio. This text should simply be a short description of what your company is and does. If the length is right, your existing slogan or tagline might do the trick. Even if you’re trying to seem fun on your company's social media pages, it's best to keep this text short and to the point. Your posted content can convey your tone; the description is just to let visitors know who you are.

Select an Image

Although you should try to keep your logo graphic as consistent as possible among Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter, you may need to make some tweaks. All three services will automatically resize images for you, but each one resizes to slightly different dimensions. For instance, Twitter pictures must be perfectly square and will show up at sizes as small as 25 by 25 pixels, and that can cause problems if your logo has different proportions.

As you can see, the text in the larger Daw Industries logo got cut off when I tried to upload it to Twitter. (That’s probably for the best, though, since the text was too small for anyone to read.) Instead of using this image, I uploaded a square version that contained just the globe part of the graphic.

 

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