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Interview: Bringing on BYOD

Zafar Anjum | April 18, 2013
Singapore is a leader in the BYOD space, and emerging countries, such as India and Indonesia, are expected to be fast adopters, says Peter Marrs, Executive Director, End User Computing Business, Dell Asia Pacific & Japan Region.

Singapore is a leader in the BYOD space, and emerging countries, such as India and Indonesia, are expected to be fast adopters, says Peter Marrs, Executive Director, End User Computing Business, Dell Asia Pacific & Japan Region. 

BYOD is a big enterprise trend. Why should companies encourage this? 

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) or as we like to say here, Bring Your Own Dell, is of major interest to organisations globally.  According to Forrester, it is estimated that over 200 million workers will bring their own device to work by 2016, and we expect that number to grow. 

Two key trends driving the BYOD trend:

  • Consumerisation of IT
  • Today's next generation workforce grew up with the Internet and mobility, and want to use it in the workplace

According to a global Dell survey[1], an estimated 59 percent believe they would be at a competitive disadvantage without BYOD. On average, survey respondents identified four personal gains for their employees, including more flexible working hours (+240 extra hours each year with a mobile device), along with the ability to foster creativity, speed innovation and facilitate teamwork/collaboration. All of these can be multiplied when BYOD is fully embraced with a user-centric approach.

More than half of the IT heads surveyed agreed that BYOD has changed their business and IT culture, making them more agile and mobile, better able to deal with customer requests and increase productivity.

If some CIOs are still shying away from BYOD, why are they doing so? Do they have some fears or misconceptions? 

I would say some are still shying away due to certain risks and concerns - such as security, complexities and cost. However, these risks can be mitigated and that's where Dell is in an ideal position to help. We have published several whitepapers on the evolving workforce, BYOD and end user computing.

BYOD is no longer a technology decision, but a business decision. Businesses that do not evolve in a competitive market will be left behind. The next generation workforce are choosing employers who embrace and understand these trends. This is a big shift for CIOs, who from an end-user computing point of view, used to buy platforms that remain stable for more than a year and who run an operating system that has been around for 13 years. Now, they have to deal with devices that change every six months with numerous mobile operating system changes. CIOs have to learn how to manage this new scenario, provide users with information or applications for their personal devices, protect the business and still remain in control.

Vendors should do their part to help CIOs understand this new landscape, highlight the opportunities for their business, the potential risk and how they can reduce or mitigate these risks.

 

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