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iOS 6 Wi-Fi glitch a Web problem, not firmware issue

John Cox | Sept. 21, 2012
A Wi-Fi connection glitch sent a short-lived, but intense wave of alarm and outrage through the iPhone and iPad user community yesterday, after they updated to the just-released iOS 6. But apparently the problem had nothing to do with the operating system itself, and Apple fixed it within hours.

And in fact, something very like that was indeed the issue, as a number of users began posting.

Neogaff picked up on a MacRumors post that outlined the problem: "Here is what is going on. Ever since iOS 4(?) there has been a feature where if you connect to a WiFi network it will try to ping this site: http://www.apple.com/library/test/success.html If it is a success then it lets you connect, if it is not a success the phone trys [sic] to bring up what would be a Login page for corporate wifi networks. Example, public access points that have a login page, etc. It seems that some moron at Apple deleted the file located at http://www.apple.com/library/test/success.html and that is why it is not working. This is not an iOS 6 issue but rather a problem with Apple's website."

In a series of tweets, Steve Streza, lead platform developer for Pocket.com, a San Francisco app vendor, outlined the issues. "Your phone checks a page on http://Apple.com to see if your network is working. If not, you're probably on a network like a hotel/airport, where you have to agree to their terms before you can use the Wi-Fi. Then they show you the page so you can agree."

"The issue only affected iOS 6 devices, which use http://www.apple.com/library/test/success.html ... as their test URL. Previous OSes just used http://apple.com."

He noted that Apple would have to update the Web page, not the OS. "The test page (http://www.apple.com/library/test/success.html ...) has been updated. My iOS 6 Wi-Fi is working again," he tweeted. "If you're still having issues, toggle Wi-Fi off and on. It does the detection when you connect to the Wi-Fi network."

 

 

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