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6 biggest business security risks and how you can fight back

Jennifer Lonoff Schiff | Jan. 21, 2015
Security breaches again made big news in 2014. Yet despite years of headline stories about security leaks and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks and repeated admonishments from security professionals that businesses (and individuals) needed to do a better job protecting sensitive data, many businesses are still unprepared or not properly protected from a variety of security threats.

To avoid potential problems re Windows Server 2003, "identify all Windows Server 2003 instances; inventory all the software and functions of each server; prioritize each system based on risk and criticality; and map out a migration strategy and then execute it," Iwan advises. And if you are unable to execute all steps in house, hire someone certified to assist you.

Risk No. 6: Third-party Service Providers

"As technology becomes more specialized and complex, companies are relying more on outsourcers and vendors to support and maintain systems," notes Matt Dircks, CEO, Bomgar. "For example, restaurant franchisees often outsource the maintenance and management of their point-of-sale (POS) systems to a third-party service provider."

However, "these third-parties typically use remote access tools to connect to the company's network, but don't always follow security best practices," he says. "For example, they'll use the same default password to remotely connect to all of their clients. If a hacker guesses that password, he immediately has a foothold into all of those clients' networks."

Indeed, "many of the high profile and extremely expensive breaches of the past year (think Home Depot, Target, etc.) were due to contractor's login credentials being stolen," states Matt Zanderigo, Product Marketing Manager, ObserveIT. "According to some recent reports, the majority of data breaches — 76 percent — are attributed to the exploitation of remote vendor access channels," he says. "Even contractors with no malicious intent could potentially damage your systems or leave you open to attack."

"This threat is multiplied exponentially due to the lack of vetting done by companies before allowing third parties to access their network," adds Adam Roth, cybersecurity specialist from Dynamic Solutions International. "A potential data breach typically does not directly attack the most valuable server, but is more a game of leap frog, going from a low level computer that is less secure, then pivoting to other devices and gaining privileges," he explains.

"Companies do a fairly good job ensuring critical servers avoid malware from the Internet," he continues. "But most companies are pretty horrible at keeping these systems segmented from other systems that are much easier to compromise."

Solution: "Companies need to validate that any third party follows remote access security best practices, such as enforcing multifactor authentication, requiring unique credentials for each user, setting least-privilege permissions and capturing a comprehensive audit trail of all remote access activity," says Dircks.

In particular, "disable third-party accounts as soon as they are no longer needed; monitor failed login attempts; and have a red flag alerting you to an attack sent right away," says Roth.

General Guidance on Dealing With Breaches

"Most organizations now realize that a breach is not a matter of if but when," says Rob Sadowski, director of Technology Solutions for RSA. To minimize the impact of a security breach and leak, conduct a risk assessment to identify where your valuable data resides and what controls or procedures are in place to protect it.

Then, "build out a comprehensive incident response [and disaster recovery/business continuity] plan, determining who will be involved, from IT, to legal, to PR, to executive management, and test it."


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