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The clock is ticking for encryption

The clock is ticking for encryption | March 21, 2011
In the indictment that led to the expulsion of 10 Russian spies from the U.S. last summer, the FBI said that it had gained access to their encrypted communications after surreptitiously entering one of the spies' homes, where agents found a piece of paper with a 27-character password.

FRAMINGHAM, 21 MARCH 2011 - In the indictment that led to the expulsion of 10 Russian spies from the U.S. last summer, the FBI said that it had gained access to their encrypted communications after surreptitiously entering one of the spies' homes, where agents found a piece of paper with a 27-character password.

In essence, the FBI found it more productive to burglarize a house than to crack a 216-bit code, despite having the computational resources of the U.S. government behind it. That's because modern cryptography, when used correctly, is very strong. Cracking an encrypted message can take an incredibly long time.

The scale of the encryption-cracking challenge

Today's encryption algorithms can be broken. Their security derives from the wildly impractical lengths of time it can take to do so.

Let's say you're using a 128-bit AES cipher. The number of possible keys with 128 bits is 2 raised to the power of 128, or 3.4x1038, or 340 undecillion. Assuming no information on the nature of the key is available (such as the fact that the owner likes to use his or her children's birthdays), a code-breaking attempt would require testing each possible key until one was found that worked.

Assuming that enough computing power was amassed to test 1 trillion keys per second, testing all possible keys would take 10.79 quintillion years. This is about 785 million times the age of the visible universe (13.75 billion years). On the other hand, you might get lucky in the first 10 minutes.

But using quantum technology with the same throughput, exhausting the possibilities of a 128-bit AES key would take about six months. If a quantum system had to crack a 256-bit key, it would take about as much time as a conventional computer needs to crack a 128-bit key.

A quantum computer could crack a cipher that uses the RSA or EC algorithms almost immediately.

-- Lamont Wood

"The entire commercial world runs off the assumption that encryption is rock-solid and is not breakable," says Joe Moorcones, a vice president at SafeNet, an information security vendor in Belcamp, Md.

That's the case today. But within the foreseeable future, cracking those same codes could become trivial, thanks to quantum computing.

Before learning about the threat of quantum computing, it helps to understand the current state of encryption. There are two kinds of encryption algorithms used in enterprise-level communications security: symmetric and asymmetric, Moorcones explains. Symmetric algorithms are typically used to send the actual information, whereas asymmetric algorithms are used to send both the information and the keys.

 

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