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Vulnerabilities in D-Link network video recorders enable remote spying, researcher says

Lucian Constantin | Aug. 1, 2013
Some D-Link devices that enable remote access to surveillance camera feeds or other potentially sensitive data contain critical vulnerabilities that enable hackers to bypass authentication and access them from the Internet.

Some D-Link devices that enable remote access to surveillance camera feeds or other potentially sensitive data contain critical vulnerabilities that enable hackers to bypass authentication and access them from the Internet.

Researchers from security vendor Qualys have found remote authentication bypass, information disclosure, denial of service and other flaws in the D-Link DNR-322L and DNR-326 network video controllers (NVRs).

D-Link was notified of these vulnerabilities in late April and released firmware updates for the affected NVR devices in July, said Bharat Jogi, the Qualys security researcher who discovered the issues, adding that he didn't actually test the new firmware versions to determine if they're still vulnerable or not. Jogi plans to discuss the vulnerabilities Wednesday during a presentation at the BSides Las Vegas security conference.

The D-Link NVRs can connect to multiple IP cameras and record the video feeds from them for later viewing by authorized users. Both devices can hold two 4TB hard drives that D-Link estimates can be used to store high-quality audio and video recordings from four cameras for up to six weeks.

The NVRs also allow remote monitoring of camera feeds in real time and backing up the recordings to a remote FTP server.

D-Link DNR-322L is a product designed for homes and small businesses, while D-Link DNR-326 is a professional NVR intended for larger business environments.

Jogi discovered six vulnerabilities in the two NVR devices, all of which can be exploited remotely without authentication.

A common deployment for such devices is to have them connected to the Internet for remote access, the researcher said.

One vulnerability allows attackers to create an additional user on the device by simply sending an unauthenticated request to it and another allows attackers to reset the password for the administrator account.

An attacker would more likely exploit the first vulnerability to create a new user and assign privileges to it than to leverage the second one in order to change the administrator password, which would be quickly discovered, Jogi said.

The researcher also found two information disclosure vulnerabilities that allow attackers to obtain details about the IP cameras connected to an NVR, including the credentials used to access them, as well as the log-in credentials for the remote backup FTP server if one is configured.

Another vulnerability that Jogi considers a design flaw is that uploading a new firmware version to the device doesn't require authentication. This enables attackers to upload their own malicious firmware versions.

All that's needed is to know the URL used for the firmware upload feature in the Web user interface, the researcher said.

The final vulnerability enables attackers to launch a denial-of-service attack against a NVR device that can shut it down, reboot it or reset it to its factory default settings.

 

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